Alibaba Offers Bitcoin Rewards Through Lolli Shopping App for ‘Singles Day’

Posted by Leigh Cuen Nov 11, 2019

Lolli, an affiliate retail startup that gives online shoppers bitcoin instead of regular cash-back perks, just announced its first Asian partnership with Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba.

Lolli’s in-browser app allows users to shop through merchants’ websites as they normally would, but earn small bitcoin rewards delivered to the in-browser wallet.

CoinDesk reached out to Alibaba for comment and will update the article if we hear back.

This announcement comes on Singles Day, the Nov. 11 Chinese shopping holiday comparable to the U.S.’s Black Friday. Alibaba Group’s online Singles Day sales have reportedly generated more than $23 billion so far this year.

However, Lolli’s head of communications, Aubrey Strobel, told CoinDesk that Lolli perks will only be available to purchases made in the U.S. For Chinese-Americans, foreign students or travelers, this new option could add additional perks if they participate in online holiday sales, but residents in China will be unable to participate.

“Its products would be shipped from China to U.S. users,” Strobel said.

Lolli CEO Alex Adelman referred to this partnership as a milestone for the startup, which plans to expand internationally in 2020.

“This partnership is a great first step to connect the two largest economies, China and the US, through bitcoin and commerce,” he told CoinDesk. “The opportunity is available for US users only for now but we plan to expand internationally soon, letting everyone in the world easily earn and own bitcoin.”

Stepping back, several cash-back crypto startups are gearing up for the holiday shopping season. There are now several bitcoin retail apps, including competitors like Fold, Pei and SPEDN, targeting customers over the 2019 holiday shopping season, offering more bitcoin options than in previous years.

Bitcoin Price Will See $16,000 ‘Soon-Ish,’ Predicts Binance CEO CZ

Posted By Adrian Zmudzinski – CoinTelegraph

Bitcoin Price Will See $16,000 ‘Soon-Ish,’ Predicts Binance CEO CZ

Changpeng Zhao, the CEO of major cryptocurrency exchange Binance, says a price of $16,000 per Bitcoin will happen “soon-ish,” in a tweet sent on Nov. 1. Zhao explains that price predictions are easy, but getting the timing right is hard. 

He said:

“Lol, price predictions are easy. It’s just hard to be right about the timing. We will see $16k soon-ish. 1.4 billion people working on it as we speak.”

The message was an answer to the tweet of another user who pointed out that the prediction of an anonymous 4chan user predicting Bitcoin’s price would hit $16,000 by the end of October turned out to be wrong. The given prediction also stated that BTC will hit $29,000 in the first quarter of next year, $56,000 in Q3 2020 and $87,000 in Q4 2020.

At the same time, other predictions are actually less modest. John McAfee, for example, doubled down recently on his $1M Bitcoin by 2020 prediction, arguing that Bitcoin’s next price surge will be triggered by its scarcity. 

As Cointelegraph reported, the Bitcoin network mined its 18 millionth BTC last month, which means there are only 3 million BTC not yet in circulation.

Why Private Blockchain is the Future of Cryptocurrency?

Why Private Blockchain is the Future of Cryptocurrency?

If you’re reading this, you probably already know what’s Blockchain. The term, that became one of the most popular ones in recent years, beholds a whole new world of options and opportunities. Alongside all the good things, it holds a big misconception — Not all Blockchains are the same, and there are many different technologies based on the idea. The same applies to Crypto, where we can assume that all the various digital coins share the same security system, but by going deeper, we can see not only that the situation is totally different, but there’s also two major groups with a vast difference: Private and Public Blockchains. So, what’s all the fuss about?

Public Blockchains are pretty much straightforward: They are using one of the strongest encryptions today, but not in an exclusive way. A lot of Cryptocurrencies use Ethereum’s Blockchain system, which has proven to be a solid and secure way to deal with digital currencies. The pros are obvious: You can save quite a lot of time in using a “template” instead of investing more time and money in creating your own Blockchain technology, thus allowing you to focus on other elements.

But when it comes to private Blockchains, we get a different picture. Why? Because the effort that was given in, created extra advantages, for example:

Faster Transactions: The shared foundation between all cryptocurrencies that use the same Blockchain can be overloaded sometimes. The more coins used, and actions done, the more traffic it needs to host successfully. A private network will only need to monitor its exclusive content, thus ensuring faster rates.

Safer Process: Sure, Blockchain is safe, but if you manage to somehow hack through a private network, chances are all of the cryptocurrencies hosted on it are in grave danger. When there’s a private system, you need to analyze a whole different set if you want to hack it. A similar factor is that open-code systems are usually safer than closed one, due to the various alterations that can be done on it.

Full Customization: Let’s face it, no public system can fully interact with the individual concerns, will and demand. A private Blockchain allows you to fully integrate your ideas and goals with every aspect, thus fulfilling your full potential.

Not losing edge: When there are many players in the field, there needs to be some sort of consolation between all of them. When they’ll demand changes in the masses, you may be one of those who need them, or maybe be the one to lose from them instead. With a private Blockchain, you’re the boss — And you do whatever you need to keep YOUR product at the best state possible. Democracy is nice, but in this case — Being a single ruler is way better.

As we can see, the two groups might seem almost identical at first, but in the end — It’s apples and oranges, hardcore mode. Know your differences before you dive in, not only as an ICO entrepreneur, but as an investor or even someone who just checks the surface. Either public or private — Go for the right cause!

What is Blockchain Technology?

Posted by CoinDesk

“The practical consequence […is…] for the first time, a way for one Internet user to transfer a unique piece of digital property to another Internet user, such that the transfer is guaranteed to be safe and secure, everyone knows that the transfer has taken place, and nobody can challenge the legitimacy of the transfer. The consequences of this breakthrough are hard to overstate.”

– Marc Andreessen

From a cruising altitude, a blockchain might not look that different from things you’re familiar with, say Wikipedia.

With a blockchain, many people can write entries into a record of information, and a community of users can control how the record of information is amended and updated. Likewise, Wikipedia entries are not the product of a single publisher. No one person controls the information.

Descending to ground level, however, the differences that make blockchain technology unique become more clear. While both run on distributed networks (the internet), Wikipedia is built into the World Wide Web (WWW) using a client-server network model.

A user (client) with permissions associated with its account is able to change Wikipedia entries stored on a centralized server.

Whenever a user accesses the Wikipedia page, they will get the updated version of the ‘master copy’ of the Wikipedia entry. Control of the database remains with Wikipedia administrators allowing for access and permissions to be maintained by a central authority.

Wikipedia’s digital backbone is similar to the highly protected and centralized databases that governments or banks or insurance companies keep today. Control of centralized databases rests with their owners, including the management of updates, access and protecting against cyber-threats.

The distributed database created by blockchain technology has a fundamentally different digital backbone. This is also the most distinct and important feature of blockchain technology.

Wikipedia’s ‘master copy’ is edited on a server and all users see the new version. In the case of a blockchain, every node in the network is coming to the same conclusion, each updating the record independently, with the most popular record becoming the de-facto official record in lieu of there being a master copy.

Transactions are broadcast, and every node is creating their own updated version of events.

It is this difference that makes blockchain technology so useful – It represents an innovation in information registration and distribution that eliminates the need for a trusted party to facilitate digital relationships.

Yet, blockchain technology, for all its merits, is not a new technology.

Rather, it is a combination of proven technologies applied in a new way. It was the particular orchestration of three technologies (the Internet, private key cryptography and a protocol governing incentivization) that made bitcoin creator Satoshi Nakamoto’s idea so useful.

The result is a system for digital interactions that does not need a trusted third party. The work of securing digital relationships is implicit — supplied by the elegant, simple, yet robust network architecture of blockchain technology itself.

Defining digital trust

Trust is a risk judgement between different parties, and in the digital world, determining trust often boils down to proving identity (authentication) and proving permissions (authorization).

Put more simply, we want to know, ‘Are you who you say you are?’ and ‘Should you be able to do what you are trying to do?’

In the case of blockchain technology, private key cryptography provides a powerful ownership tool that fulfills authentication requirements. Possession of a private key is ownership. It also spares a person from having to share more personal information than they would need to for an exchange, leaving them exposed to hackers.

Authentication is not enough. Authorization – having enough money, broadcasting the correct transaction type, etc – needs a distributed, peer-to-peer network as a starting point. A distributed network reduces the risk of centralized corruption or failure.

This distributed network must also be committed to the transaction network’s recordkeeping and security. Authorizing transactions is a result of the entire network applying the rules upon which it was designed (the blockchain’s protocol).

Authentication and authorization supplied in this way allow for interactions in the digital world without relying on (expensive) trust. Today, entrepreneurs in industries around the world have woken up to the implications of this development – unimagined, new and powerful digital relationshionships are possible. Blockchain technology is often described as the backbone for a transaction layer for the Internet, the foundation of the Internet of Value.

In fact, the idea that cryptographic keys and shared ledgers can incentivize users to secure and formalize digital relationships has imaginations running wild. Everyone from governments to IT firms to banks is seeking to build this transaction layer.

Authentication and authorization, vital to digital transactions, are established as a result of the configuration of blockchain technology.

The idea can be applied to any need for a trustworthy system of record.

Authored by Nolan Bauerle; images by Maria Kuznetsov

 

https://www.coindesk.com/information/what-is-blockchain-technology